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What does Redux model?

β€’ ~2 min read


In the previous post, we talked about the type signature for reduce and how it essentially iterates over a list and combines all of the elements together using a reducer function.

You may have heard reducer before within the context of Redux, but how do the two concepts relate? Let’s start with a very basic reducer

type State = number;
const DEFAULT_STATE: State = 0;

type IncrementAction = {
	type: "INCREMENT";
};

type DecrementAction = {
	type: "DECREMENT";
};

type SetAction = {
	type: "SET";
	value: number;
};

type Action =
	| IncrementAction
	| DecrementAction
	| SetAction;

function reducer(
	state: State,
	action: Action,
) {
	switch (action.type) {
		case "INCREMENT":
			return state + 1;
		case "DECREMENT":
			return state - 1;
		case "SET":
			return action.value;
		default:
			return state;
	}
}

This should look familiar to any who has dabbled with Redux. State is just a number here, and we’ve got a few actions that can update it. You might bind some buttons to dispact some of these actions to update your state according to which action got dispatched.

What would happen if we used the reducer function with an array of actions though?

const actions: Action[] = [
	{
		type: "DECREMENT",
	},
	{
		type: "DECREMENT",
	},
	{
		type: "SET",
		value: 0,
	},
	{
		type: "DECREMENT",
	},
	{
		type: "SET",
		value: 12,
	},
	{
		type: "INCREMENT",
	},
	{
		type: "INCREMENT",
	},
	{
		type: "INCREMENT",
	},
];

// result === 15
const result = actions.reduce(
	reducer,
	DEFAULT_STATE,
);

We get 15 because even though we decremented a few times, we ended up just setting the value to 12 and then incrementing three times after that.

The only difference between this and what actually happens with Redux is that the actions are not in an array being reduced synchronously. Instead they happen over time.

Redux is modeling actions being reduced over time with State being the accumulator!

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